Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center, RIPIRG Education Fund

Too Close to Home

The 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster delivered a reminder to the world that nuclear power comes with inherent risks. Among the risks demonstrated by the Fukushima crisis is the threat of water contamination, including contamination of drinking water supplies by radioactive material. In the United States, 49 million Americans receive their drinking water from surface sources located within 50 miles of an active nuclear power plant—inside the boundary the Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses to assess risk to food and water supplies.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

Gobbling Less Gas for Thanksgiving

Environment Rhode Island's new report, “Gobbling Less Gas for Thanksgiving: How Clean Car Standards Will Cut Oil Use and Save Americans Money,” uses regional Thanksgiving travel projections released by AAA to estimate how much less oil would be used—and how much money would be saved at the gas pump—if the average car taking those trips in Rhode Island this Thanksgiving met the 54.5 miles-per-gallon fuel efficiency standard the Obama administration is proposing for new cars and light trucks by model year 2025.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

The Way Forward on Global Warming

With a gridlock on energy and climate policy in Congress, Rhode Island and other states can take matters into their own hands to dramatically reduce global warming emissions.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

Danger in the Air

Pollution from power plants and vehicles puts the health of our nation’s children and families at risk. Ground-level ozone, the main component of smog, is one of the most harmful and one of the most pervasive air pollutants. There are millions of people living in metropolitan areas around the country, including in Rhode Island, exposed to multiple days each summer when the air is unhealthy to breathe. This report ranks metropolitan areas for their unhealthy air days in 2010 and 2011.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

A Program that Works

Environment Rhode Island's new report, “Gobbling Less Gas for Thanksgiving: How Clean Car Standards Will Cut Oil Use and Save Americans Money,” uses regional Thanksgiving travel projections released by AAA to estimate how much less oil would be used—and how much money would be saved at the gas pump—if the average car taking those trips in Rhode Island this Thanksgiving met the 54.5 miles-per-gallon fuel efficiency standard the Obama administration is proposing for new cars and light trucks by model year 2025.

Pages