News Release | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

New report: Every Rhode Island county hit by multiple recent weather disasters; research says global warming to bring more extreme weather

With bizarre weather patterns this winter and recent years in which many parts of the country have experienced scorching heat, devastating wildfires, severe storms, and record flooding, a new Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center report documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future.

News Release | Environment Rhode Island

Environment Rhode Island Announces Legislative Priorities for 2012

Environment Rhode Island’s main priorities include reducing air pollution and spurring our economy through supporting a plan to reduce Rhode Island’s dependence on petroleum, keeping our waterways clean by banning single use plastic checkout bags, and supporting a suite of environmental policies to preserve open spaces and protect Narragansett Bay.

News Release | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

Nuclear Power Plants Threaten Drinking Water for Tens of Thousands of Rhode Islanders

The drinking water for tens, perhaps hundreds of thousands of people in Rhode Island could be at risk of radioactive contamination from a leak or accident at a local nuclear power plant, says a new study released today by Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center and Rhode Island PIRG Education Fund.

News Release | Environment Rhode Island

President Obama Expected to Stand Up to Big Oil on Keystone XL Pipeline

With President Obama and the State Department poised to reject an effort to force administration approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, Environment Rhode Island's Channing Jones issues a statement of thanks and support.

News Release | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

One Million Acres Around the Grand Canyon Protected from Toxic Mining

After more than 2 years of environmental analysis and receiving nearly 300,000 public comments from the American people, environmental and conservation groups, the outdoor recreation industry, mayors, and tribal leaders, Secretary Salazar withdrew more than 1 million acres of land around the canyon from new mining claims for the next twenty years.

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