Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

In the Path of the Storm

Nearly six months after Hurricane Sandy and just over two months after Winter Storm Nemo, a new Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center report finds that weather-related disasters are already affecting hundreds of millions of Americans, including all Rhode Island counties, and documents how global warming could lead to certain extreme weather events becoming even more common or more severe in the future.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

A Double Success: Tackling Global Warming While Growing the Economy with an Improved Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative

The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a central strategy in the Northeastern states’ efforts to protect the region from global warming. Now, nine Northeastern states are considering strengthening RGGI to drive additional reductions in global warming pollution. Strengthening RGGI would be a “win-win” for the Northeast, making an important contribution toward protecting the region from global warming while speeding the transition to a clean energy future.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center

Wind Power for a Cleaner America

As Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath prompt more Rhode Islanders to call for action to tackle global warming and the rise in extreme weather, Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center released a new report that shows that power generation from wind energy projects currently under construction will displace as much global warming pollution as taking 1000 cars off the road per year.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research & Policy Center, National Wildlife Federation

The Turning Point for Atlantic Offshore Wind Energy

As America struggles to revitalize our economy, create jobs, secure an energy independent future, and protect our communities and wildlife from the dangers of climate change, one energy source offers a golden opportunity to power our homes and businesses without creating more pollution – Atlantic offshore wind.

Report | Environment Rhode Island Research and Policy Center

When it Rains, it Pours

Global warming is happening now and its effects are being felt in the United States and around the world. Among the expected consequences of global warming is an increase in the heaviest rain and snow storms, fueled by increased evaporation and the ability of a warmer atmosphere to hold more moisture.

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